Riboflavin – Vitamin B2

Riboflavin (also known as vitamin B2):

Riboflavin, vitamin B2, food sources and possible symptoms of deficiency.

Deficiencies of other B vitamins can cause a deficiency of riboflavin and vice versa. Riboflavin is involved in the metabolism of vitamin B6, niacin, folic acid and iron.  Riboflavin is also needed for metabolism of drugs and toxins and is essential for releasing energy from food.

Alcoholics, anorexics, and people low in other B vitamins are at risk of deficiency but otherwise deficiency is rare.  Riboflavin is in many foods.

Deficiency symptoms may include decreased red blood cell count with normal sized red blood cells; sore throat; magenta/red inflamed tongue, mouth, and throat; sore cracks at the sides of the mouth; and skin rashes.  Deficiency may increase risk of pre-eclampsia and age related cataracts.  Supplemental riboflavin was found helpful for preventing migraines.

Food Sources of Riboflavin (B2) include:

Fortified flour & cereal, whole grains, meats, fish, milk, eggs, meat, fish, beans, nuts, and seeds, nutritional yeast flakes, asparagus, broccoli, yellow summer squash, spinach.

Risks of overdose for water soluble B vitamins and vitamin C are rare:

B vitamins and vitamin C are water soluble, so overdose is rare.  Deficiency is more common because the nutrients are not stored like the fat soluble nutrients:  A, D, E, and K; and water soluble vitamins are not conserved by the kidneys like the electrolyte minerals:  calcium, sodium, magnesium, and potassium.

Riboflavin is a bright yellow nutrient and when taking higher doses in supplements may cause a bright yellow colored urine – it is non-toxic and would be less noticeable, a paler shade of yellow, when plenty of water is also being drunk throughout the day. Any time dehydration is present the color of the urine will be a darker shade and is a good reminder to try to drink plenty of water – 6-10 glasses roughly depending on body size, and amount of exercise performed and the level of heat or humidity in the environment.

REFERENCE USED FOR FOOD SOURCES & SYMPTOMS OF Riboflavin DEFICIENCY:

Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes.

Other References:

  1. [dietandfitnesstoday.com/riboflavin-in-beans.php]
  2. https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/45194432?fgcd=&manu=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=&sort=default&order=asc&qlookup=nutritional+yeast&ds=&qt=&qp=&qa=&qn=&q=&ing=
  3. https://draxe.com/top-10-vitamin-b2-riboflavin-foods/
  4. http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/definition-riboflavin-6444.html
  5. https://www.swansonvitamins.com/blog/lindsey/types-of-squash-health-benefits

Healthy hair is the proof – of a healing diet

Strong, shiny hair that grows well and isn’t thinning can be a visual sign of good health inside the body too. Hair and fingernails are a slightly tougher form of skin and outer skin is a slightly tougher form of the membranes that line our internal organs and cells.

A more in depth analysis of the nutrient content in the Dairy, fish and meat version of the 30% of calories from carbohydrates example menu (the last one in the series) showed that adding herbs and spices does add nutrients to your day’s average intake, adding essential fatty acids and the green leafy ones include quite a bit of potassium which can help reduce the risk of hypertension. High blood pressure problems may be due to low potassium intake rather than just a problem of excess sodium. Nuts and seeds are also very nutritious.

The reanalysis led to a few slight changes in macronutrients as I went to a nutrient database that was more complete for a few ingredients (listed in the References below) so to make it close to 2000 again I reduced the portion of hemp kernels to one tablespoon.

Macro-nutrients: Total calories 2003 with approximately 129 grams of protein (516 calories, 25.8% ); 90 grams fat (810 calories, 40.4%): 147 grams digestible complex/simple carbohydrates (588 calories, 29.4%); and 47 grams of indigestible fiber. (*The math percents don’t add up but in the nutrient databases the total calories do not always match the amount calculated from the grams – it is all somewhat estimated based on average types of foods and portions, so do pay attention to your own body’s hunger and fullness cues – and remember that thirst is best quenched with water. It is common to mistake thirst for hunger and to overeat and still not be satisfied because you needed a drink of water. In nature only breast milk and water are beverages that we were accustomed to having at different stages of life. Whole fruit and vegetables have fiber which slow down digestion of the fluid and sugars..)

The summary findings are vitamin D is very inadequate, only milk for drinking is notified so even with cheese and yogurt the amount is very low. Vitamin B 12 was also slightly low and potassium was helped by the spices but even with several vegetables the limited fruit left potassium (increasing the portion size of beans in place of meat increased the potassium a lot but decreased niacin and a couple minerals) and vitamin C slightly below goal. B vitamins are provided however and other minerals are within the U.S. Recommended Daily Intake goals. Calcium was over provided with the dairy servings plus calcium rich seeds and vegetables. I have three more plans to calculate, so we will see if B12 is more plentiful in any of the other examples.

*Macronutrients for the 30% carbohydrate with dairy and fish plan – 1993 calories with 127 grams Protein (508 calories, 25.5%/1993); 79 grams Fat (711 calories, 35.7%/1993); 145 grams digestible complex/simple Carbohydrate (580 calories, 29.1%/1993); and 73 grams indigestible Fiber.

** Macronutrients for the 30% carbohydrate with dairy plan – has walnuts and almonds instead – 1970 calories with 95 grams Protein (380 calories, 19.3%/1970); 91 grams Fat (819 calories, 41.6%/1970); 147 grams of digestible complex/simple Carbohydrate (588 calories, 29.8%/1970); and 78 grams indigestible Fiber.

*** Macronutrients for the 30% carbohydrate vegan plan – has 2 teaspoons of Nutritional Yeast Flakes added as a vegetarian source of B12, and 1/4 cup avocado, 1/2 cup tomato and large leaf of lettuce to make a sandwich or salad with it. I also added 1 teaspoon of cumin and coriander and 1/4 cup raw cilantro as I have been trying to eat those everyday. Cilantro may help the body with detoxification of heavy metals. – Calories 1964 with 84.9 grams protein, (340 calories, 17.3%/1964); 89.6 grams Fat (806 calories, 41%/1964); 148.8 grams digestible complex/simple Carbohydrate (595 calories, 30.3%/1964); and 93.3 grams indigestible Fiber.

*The list includes data for four meal plans now, within the same bullet point for easier comparison.

Micro-nutrients in milligrams (mg) unless otherwise listed:

Not all foods had information for all of the nutrients so this is an underestimate for some (Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Pantothenic Acid, Choline, Betaine, Vitamin D, E, K, Omega 3 and 6 Fatty Acids are some with incomplete data available).

  • 1615.03 mg Calcium /dairy & fish with beans & sweet potato instead of meat & fries – 1642.03/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish – 1653.93// ///vegan plan- 1181.23/// I double checked the math. This is the with dairy meal plan and it is providing an excess amount of calcium. Goal: 1300 mg is recommended for teens of either gender, and 1000-1200 for older adults.
  • 23.72 mg Iron /with beans instead of meat… – 46.27/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish – 44.96//  ///vegan plan-59.92 (hemp kernel portion size is larger in this plan, they are an exceptional source///- Goal: 8-11 for teen boys and men and menopausal women, 15-18 for teen girls and women.
  • 531.99 mg Magnesium /with beans instead of meat… – 750.99/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -777.79// ///vegan plan-856.07/// – Goal:  240-360 for boys, girls and women, 400-420 for men.
  • 2185.3 mg Phosphorus /with beans instead of meat… – 2467.8/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -2242.3// ///vegan plan-1993.5/// – Goal: 1250 for children and teens, 700 for adults.
  • 4385.47 mg Potassium /with beans instead of meat… – 5600.47/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -4791.97 (took out Dill Weed too, it helped here)// ///vegan plan-5341.67///- Goal: 4.5-4.7 grams 4500-4700 mg.
  • 1887.68 mg Sodium /with beans instead of meat… -1165.18/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -1183.28// ///vegan plan- 786.33 ( I add salt to taste at the table, whole vegan foods tend to be very low salt, this amount could be too low for health///- Goal: 1.2-1.5 grams, 1200-1500 mg.
  • 17.52 mg Zinc – /with beans instead of meat… –  15.74/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -15.69// ///vegan plan-14.736/// Goal: 8-9 mg for children, teen girls & women, 11 for teen boys & men.
  • 2.425 mg Copper – /with beans instead of meat… – 3.225/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -3.225// ///vegan plan-4.663 (Chia seeds portion is larger in this plan, it and other nuts, beans and avocado are a source, too much can be a problem, especially if there is too little zinc in the diet/// Goal: 700-900 micrograms (which would be 0.7-0.9 mg)
  • 3.81 mg Manganese -/with beans instead of meat… – 8.71/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -9.81// ///vegan plan-8.509/// Goal: 1.6-1.8 for girls and women, 1.9-2.3 for boys and men.
  • 308.125 micrograms Selenium -/with beans instead of meat… – 290.275/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -219.575// ///vegan plan-199.405/// Goal: 40-55 micrograms
  • 36.45 mg Fluoride -/with beans instead of meat… – 14.05/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -14.05// ///vegan plan-4.25/// Goal: 2-4 mg
  • 57.65 mg Vitamin C -/with beans instead of meat… – 51.25 (also without raw tomato)///dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -49.65// ///vegan plan-80.97/// Goal: 45-75 mg for children 9-13 y, teens & women, 90 mg for men.
  • 2.048 mg Thiamin (B1) -/with beans instead of meat… – 2.285/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -2.022// ///vegan plan- 4.221 (the nutritional yeast flakes is exceptionally high in several B vitamins)/// Goal: 0.9-1.2 mg
  • 2.111 mg Riboflavin (B2) -/with beans instead of meat… – 2.312/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -1.903// ///vegan plan- 3.788/// Goal: 0.9-1.3 mg
  • 30.421 mg Niacin (B3) -/with beans instead of meat… – 24.421/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -9.984// ///vegan plan- 19.969/// Goal:  12-16 mg
  • 6.27 mg Pantothenic Acid (B5) -/with beans instead of meat… – 6.77/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -3.97// ///vegan plan- 4.12/// Goal: 4-5 mg
  • 2.73 mg Vitamin B6 -/with beans instead of meat… – 2.582/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -1.129//  ///vegan plan- 2.534/// Goal: 1.0-1.7 mg
  • 365.02 mg Folate -/with beans instead of meat… – 724.52/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -707.62// ///vegan plan-928.32 (the nutritional yeast)/// Goal: 300-400 mg
  • 8.54 micrograms vitamin B12 -/with beans instead of meat… – 6.02/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -1.32// ///vegan plan-2.9 /// Goal: 1.8 for children and teens, 2.4 for adults.
  • 153 mg Choline /with beans instead of meat… – 76.3/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -96.5// ///vegan plan- 78.5/// (newer discovery, in the family of water soluble B vitamins) – Goal: 375-400 mg for children and teen girls, 425 for women and 550 for teen boys and men.
  • 7.71 mg Betaine /with beans instead of meat… – 22.01 (the sweet potato was the great source)/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -22.16// ///vegan plan- 43.11/// (also in the family of water soluble B vitamins) – Goal: 20-25 for children, 9-13 y and teens, 30 for adults.
  • 154.1 Vitamin A in RAE /with beans instead of meat… – 598.1 (the sweet potato was the great source)/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -589.1// ///vegan plan- 1298.1/// (Retinal A Equivalents) -new & not all data is available
  • 18329.45 IU Vitamin A /with beans instead of meat… – 27233.9/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -26988.2// ///vegan plan-40913.2///  (IU – International Units, beta-carotene and retinal) – Goal: 600-900 micrograms, (extra beta-carotene from produce is nontoxic, excess retinal can be a danger especially to a developing fetus)
  • 6.4 IU Vitamin D /with beans instead of meat… – 3.4/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -3.4// ///vegan plan- 0/// (IU – International Units) *note only liquid milk for drinking is typically fortified with vitamin D, the yogurt and cheese is clearly not a good source. – Goal: 15-20 micrograms (the IU is confusing, I will have to brush up on what exactly is meant)
  • 11.49 mg Vitamin E – /with beans instead of meat… – 20.2 (increasing the portion size of hemp kernels made the difference here)/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -27.8// ///vegan plan- 30.456/// Goal: 11 mg for 9-13 year old children and 15 mg for teens and adults.
  • 128.11 micrograms Vitamin K -/with beans instead of meat… – 91.51 (there had been extra lettuce with the hamburger, salad is great have some!/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -91.91// ///vegan plan-152.66///  Goal: 60-75 for children 9-13 y, and teens, 90 for women, 120 for men.
  • 28.341 grams Saturated Fat /with beans instead of meat… – 23.891/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -24.483// ///vegan plan- 14.97///
  • 26.867 grams Mono-unsaturated Fat /with beans instead of meat… – 21.251/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -19.551// ///vegan plan- 20.89///
  • 25.931 grams Poly-unsaturated Fat /with beans instead of meat… – 26.9/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -34.9// ///vegan plan- 42.457///
  • 0.393 grams Trans-unsaturated Fat /with beans instead of meat… – 0/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -0// ///vegan plan- 0///
  • 257.5 milligrams Cholesterol /with beans instead of meat… – 186.5/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -77.5// ///vegan plan- 0///
  • 7005.43 milligrams Omega-3 Fatty Acids (Salmon and Chia Seeds were extremely good sources) – /with beans instead of meat… –  7251.33 (black beans are a good source)/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -4542.03 (walnuts are a good source but the salmon was a better source)// ///vegan plan- 6877.08/// Goal: 1.0 – 1.6 grams – which would be 1000 to 1600 milligrams – this recommendation is lower than some doses found beneficial in research, 6 grams/6000 milligrams has been used in depression studies. (23)
  • 13908.25 milligrams Omega-6 Fatty Acids (Brazil Nuts, Tahini, Hemp Kernels were extremely good sources, Salmon, Chia and Pomegranate Seeds were good sources.) – /with beans instead of meat… – 16490.25 (increasing portion size of hemp kernels was the main increase but beans are also a source)/ //dairy & beans, with almonds, walnuts instead of fish -24892.25//  ///vegan plan- 28920.45/// Goal: 10-12 grams for females, 12-17 for males – which would be 10000-17000 milligrams,
  • Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes.

References:

  1. Black Beans, cooked with salt, 1 cup (x.5) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/legumes-and-legume-products/4419/2
  2. Yogurt, plain, skim milk 13 gr protein per 1 cup (x .5)  http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/106/2
  3. Parmesan Cheese, shredded 1 Tbs (x 2) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/134/2
  4. Ricotta Cheese, part skim 1 cup (x.25) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/36/2
  5. Cheddar Cheese, 1 ounce, 28 grams http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/8/2
  6. USDA Food Composition Databases,  brazil nuts https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/45157777?fgcd=&manu=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=&sort=default&order=asc&qlookup=brazil+nuts&ds=&qt=&qp=&qa=&qn=&q=&ing=
  7. Nut and Seed Products, Brazil Nuts (1 cup is 133 grams, I divided by 14.25 to get 1/3 of 28 grams) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3091/2
  8. Finfish and shellfish products, Salmon, Alaska wild caught, 1/2 fillet 154 grams,   http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/finfish-and-shellfish-products/4231/2
  9. Carrot, raw 1 cup, (x .5) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2383/2
  10. Celery, raw, 110 gr, (x .5) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2396/2
  11. Spice, Basil, dried leaves, 1 tablespoon, 2 gr   http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/spices-and-herbs/173/2
  12. Oregano, dried, 1 teaspoon 1 gr http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/spices-and-herbs/197/2
  13. Chives, freeze-dried, 1/4 cup, 1 gr ( x.25) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2733/2
  14. Lundberg Organic Brown Rice Cake, Lightly Salted,  1 cake is 60 calories,  http://www.lundberg.com/product/organic-brown-rice-cake-lightly-salted/
  15. Rice long grain, brown cooked, 1 cup, 216 calories ( multiply x .56) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5707/2
  16. Tahini from roasted and hulled seeds, most common type, 1 tablespoon ( x 2) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3142/2
  17. Chia Seeds, dried, 1 ounce (28 grams) (~ 2 Tbs) (x  .5)) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3061/2
  18. Pomegranate, one 4 inch, (x .5 ~ 1/3-1/2 cup seeds) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/2038/2
  19. Vegetable oil, coconut http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fats-and-oils/508/2
  20. Cocoa powder processed with alkali, Dutch, 1 cup, 86 gr (x .125) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/sweets/5472/2
  21. Tarragon, dried leaves, 1 tablespoon, 2 gr http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/spices-and-herbs/210/2
  22. Hemp seed kernels, * complete protein source (Table 3) and good source of GLA omega 6 fatty acid  http://www.fao.org/fsnforum/sites/default/files/discussions/contributions/Hempseed_as_a_nutritional_resource-_An_overview_2.pdf
  23. Alan C. Logan, Omega-3 fatty acids and major depression: A primer for the mental health professional. Lipids Health Dis. 2004; 3: 25. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC533861/
  24. Sweet Potato cooked, baked in skin without salt, 1 medium (60 gram) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2667/2
  25. Walnuts, English, 1 ounce (28 gr) (x .5) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3138/2
  26. Almonds, ( 1 ounce 23 whole kernels), http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3085/2
  27. Cumin Seed, ground spice, 1 Tbs (x .33) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/spices-and-herbs/184/2
  28. Coriander Seed, ground spice, 1 Tbs (x .33) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/spices-and-herbs/183/2
  29. Cilantro, raw, 1/4 cup http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2414/2
  30. Avocado, raw 1 ounce 28 gr (x 1.8), http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1843/2
  31. Nutrient Recommendations: Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) Goals https://ods.od.nih.gov/Health_Information/Dietary_Reference_Intakes.aspx
  32. Hamburger, 95% lean, 5% fat, pan  broiled, 100 gr (~ 4 oz) http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products/6190/2

More 30% calories from carbohydrate diet plan examples

Adding salmon as a source of omega 3 fatty acids and a tablespoon of dried dill weed for flavor and additional phytonutrients, increased the ratio of protein and decreased the ratio of fat while maintaining the carbohydrate ratio. The walnuts were removed as a vegetarian source of omega 3 fatty acids and the almonds were removed to reduce total calories.

The calories totaled 2001, with 126.75 grams protein (507 calories, 25.3%/2001); 78.31 grams fat, (704.8 calories, 35%/2001); 148.66 grams digestible complex/simple carbohydrates, (594.6 calories, 29.7%/2001); 57.4 grams indigestible fiber.

30% carbohydrate diet plan example with low carbohydrate dairy and omega 3 rich fish; it includes approximately 2-3 low carbohydrate dairy equivalents (1 cup/1 ounce); 5 protein (1 ounce) meat/fish equivalents; 6-7 protein (1 ounce/ 1/2 cup beans) equivalents of the bean, nut, and seed group; 1 fruit group serving; 2 bread group servings; 6 vegetable group servings; 1 additional fat group serving (the nuts/seeds contain quite a bit of fat, the coconut oil is the additional fat serving):

Black beans, 2 cups
Greens, 2 cups
Fennel Seed 2 Tbs
Yogurt, plain, lowfat unswtnd (1/2 cup)
Parmesan Cheese, shredded, 2 Tbs
Ricotta Cheese, 1 cup
Cheddar Cheese, 28 gr/1 ounce
Brazil nuts, 2-3, 1/3 oz
Salmon, wild caught 5 ounces
Carrot, 1 med, 1/2 cup, 61 gr
Celery, 1 large, 1/2 cup, 61 gr
Basil, dried, 1 Tbs
Oregano, dried 1 tsp
Chives, dried 1 Tbsp
Lemon Juice, conc bttld 2 Tbs
Sweet Potato, plain 1/2 cup 55 gr
Lundberg Rice Cakes, 2
Tahini, 1 oz, 2 Tbs
Chia Seeds, 2 Tbs
Pomegranate seeds, raw 1/2 cup, 70 gr
Coconut oil, 1 teaspoon
Cocoa Powder, 2 Tbs
Tarragon, dried, 1 Tbs
Hemp kernels, 3 Tbs
Dill weed, dried, 1 Tbs

What if you don’t like beans? I would encourage you to start with a smaller amount per day, 1/2 cup serving remains in the following meal plan example to help get the digestive system adjusted to them. In place of the larger serving of beans and side dish of sweet potatoes is a hamburger and bun, 1/2 cup of French Fries, 1/2 a Dill Pickle, lettuce, tomato, 1 tablespoon of ketchup and a teaspoon of mustard – the dill pickle and mustard are essentially calorie free foods but they add significant amounts of salt so portion control is still a good idea. Cardamom spice is also added in, but simply because I forgot it in the earlier example of my own typical diet plan.

The new example totals 2004 calories with 129.94 grams of protein (520 calories, 26%/2004); 90.17 grams fat (811.5 calories,  40.5%/2004); 143.99 grams of digestible complex/simple carbohydrate (576 calories, 28.7%/2004); 40.2 grams indigestible fiber.

It includes approximately 2-3 low carbohydrate dairy equivalents (1 cup/1 ounce); 9 protein (1 ounce) meat/fish equivalents; 3-4 protein (1 ounce/ 1/2 cup beans) equivalents of the bean, nut, and seed group; 1 fruit group serving; 4 bread group servings; 6 vegetable group servings; 1 additional fat group serving (the coconut oil).

Black beans, 1/2 cup
Greens, 2 cups
Fennel Seed 2 Tbs
Yogurt, plain, lowfat unswtnd (1/2 cup)
Parmesan Cheese, shredded, 2 Tbs
Ricotta Cheese, 1 cup
Cheddar Cheese, 28 gr/1 ounce
Brazil nuts, 2-3, 1/3 oz
Salmon, wild caught 5 ounces
Carrot, 1 med, 1/2 cup, 61 gr
Celery, 1 large, 1/2 cup, 61 gr
Basil, dried, 1 Tbs
Oregano, dried 1 tsp
Chives, dried 1 Tbsp
Lemon Juice, conc bttld 2 Tbs
Cardamom, spice, 1 tsp
Lundberg Rice Cakes, 2
Tahini, 1 oz, 2 Tbs
Chia Seeds, 1 Tbs
Pomegranate seeds, raw 1/2 cup, 70 gr
Coconut oil, 1 teaspoon
Cocoa Powder, 2 Tbs
Tarragon, dried, 1 Tbs
Hemp kernels, 3 Tbs
Dill weed, dried, 1 Tbs
Beef, grnd, 93% lean, 7% fat, 4 ounces
Hamburger Bun, enriched, one
French Fries, 84 grams (~ 1/2 cup)
Dill Pickle, Organic Kosher, 28 grams, 1/2 spear
Tomato, raw sliced, ~ 1/2 cup
Lettuce, 1 outer leaf, 24 grams

Ketchup, 17 grams ~ 1 tablespoon

Mustard, yellow, 5 grams, ~ 1 teaspoon

(the last two items simply didn’t copy/paste with the rest of the table.)

Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes. Thanks.

So what might a 30% calories from carbohydrates diet plan include?

Good question, as a starting point some background information:

The percentages on Nutrient Facts Labels on foods sold in the United States are based on a 2000 calorie diet with a goal that will include 20 percent calories from protein, 35% from fats, and 45% from carbohydrates – this represents a change at at the federal level that will be seen in the market place in a phased in process between July 2018 to July 2019. The current/old percentages were 20% from protein, 30% from fats and 50% from carbohydrates. Medical research trials with weight loss and other chronic illness however suggested that a lower carbohydrate diet is healthier for the average person.

  • Carbohydrates include digestible complex and simple carbohydrates which provide about 4 calories per gram and also include indigestible carbohydrates in the form of fiber which are not considered to provide calories for our diet but some of which may be modified into beneficial fats by healthy bacteria and provide a small of calories – but it is simpler to not count those potential calories.
  • Protein provides 4 calories per gram.
  • Fats provide 9 calories per gram.
  • Alcohol provides 7 calories per gram (yes the beer belly can be a real side effect of excess alcohol. Excess calories from alcohol tend to be stored as fat in the liver which is why cirrhosis of the liver is a risk with alcoholism).

A 2000 calorie meal plan might not be enough calories for a man and might be too many calories for a woman so it is  goal for an average adult. A 1500 calorie meal plan might be more reasonable for an older, or not very active woman.

A menu plan that provided 30% of calories from carbohydrates might include 25% of calories from protein to provide adequate protein without an excessive burden on the kidneys from too much waste to excrete from nitrogen, and that leaves 45% of calories from fats.

  • 2000 calories could be divided into 600 calories from carbohydrate, 150 grams, (approximately 10 bread group equivalents); 500 calories from protein, 125 grams, (approximately 17.8 ounces of meat group equivalents); and 900 calories from fats, 100 grams, (approximately 20 teaspoon equivalents of oil).
  • 1500 calories could be divided into 450 calories from carbohydrate, 112.5 grams (approximately 7.5 bread group equivalents); 375 calories from protein, 93.75 grams, (approximately 12.3 ounces of meat group equivalents); and 675 calories from fat, 75 grams, (approximately 15 teaspoons equivalents of oil).
  • In a typical diet plan 2 to 3 servings of dairy group would use some of the carbohydrate and protein group equivalents and some of the fat depending on whether skim milk or higher fat milk group servings were chosen. I am not alone in being dairy sensitive; it is not uncommon for people on the autism spectrum to have fewer negative symptoms on a dairy free diet so my own diet plan example is dairy free but I will also show what a sample meal plan with 2-3 dairy equivalents might look like.
  • A rough count of my own typical daily diet includes approximately 8 protein equivalents of the bean, nut, and seed group; 1 fruit group serving; 2 bread group servings; 6 vegetable group servings; 1 fat group serving. Adding up the calories and grams contained in my typical day’s meals and snacks suggests I may be getting 1865 calories with 79.13 grams of protein, 81.92 grams of fats, 152.33 grams of complex & simple carbohydrates, and 60.9 grams of fiber/indigestible carbohydrate, which would be 316.52 calories from protein (17%/1865), 737.28 calories from fat (39.5%/1865), and 609.32 calories from carbohydrates (32.7% of 1865).
  • Specifically I included in the nutrient calculation for my typical day’s foods:
  • Black beans, 2 cups
    Greens, 2 cups
    Fennel Seed, 2 Tbs
    Almonds, raw 3 Tbs
    Hemp kernels, 3 Tbs
    Brazil nuts, 2-3, 1/3 oz
    Carrot, 1 med, 1/2 cup, 61 gr
    Celery, 1 large, 1/2 cup, 61 gr
    Basil, dried, 1 Tbs
    Oregano, dried 1 tsp
    Chives, dried 1 Tbsp
    Lemon Juice, conc bttld 2 Tbs
    Walnuts, hlvs/pcs 1/8 cup, 1/2 oz
    Sweet Potato, plain 1 cup 110 gr
    Lundberg Rice Cakes, 2
    Tahini, 1 oz, 2 Tbs
    Glycine 1/2 tsp
    Methionine 1/2 tsp
    Chia Seeds, 2 Tbs
    Coffee, instant unsweetened, 2 Tbs
    Pomegranate seeds, raw 1/2 cup, 70 gr
    Coconut oil, 1 teaspoon
    Cocoa Powder, 2 Tbs
    Tarragon, dried, 1 Tbs

     

  • A diet plan similar to mine except with the inclusion of low carbohydrate dairy products includes unsweetened yogurt and cheese and slightly less sweet potato to reduce the total carbohydrates and half the almonds – almonds are a higher calcium nut.  I left out the amino acid supplements and instant coffee as the nutrient totals are minor and the beverage/supplements might not be needed or preferred by someone else. Total calories on the plan with low carbohydrate dairy foods equaled 1978 calories with 95.13 grams protein (380.52 calories/19.2%/1978); 90.17 grams fat (811.53 calories/41%/1978); 148.33 grams of digestible complex/simple carbohydrates (593.32 calories/30%/1978) and 58.4 grams or fiber.
  • Specifically including:
  • Black beans, 2 cups
    Greens, 2 cups
    Fennel Seed 2 Tbs
    Yogurt, plain, lowfat unswtnd (1/2 cup)
    Parmesan Cheese, shredded, 2 Tbs
    Ricotta Cheese, 1 cup
    Cheddar Cheese, 28 gr/1 ounce
    Brazil nuts, 2-3, 1/3 oz
    Walnuts, hlvs/pcs 1/8 cup, 1/2 oz
    Carrot, 1 med, 1/2 cup, 61 gr
    Celery, 1 large, 1/2 cup, 61 gr
    Basil, dried, 1 Tbs
    Oregano, dried 1 tsp
    Chives, dried 1 Tbsp
    Lemon Juice, conc bttld 2 Tbs
    Sweet Potato, plain 1/2 cup 55 gr
    Lundberg Rice Cakes, 2
    Tahini, 1 oz, 2 Tbs
    Chia Seeds, 2 Tbs
    Pomegranate seeds, raw 1/2 cup, 70 gr
    Coconut oil, 1 teaspoon
    Cocoa Powder, 2 Tbs
    Tarragon, dried, 1 Tbs
    Hemp kernels, 3 Tbs
    Almonds, raw 1 1/2 Tbs
  • A diet with excessive saturated or trans fats may increase heart disease risk so no more than 10% of calories from saturated fats is recommended and limiting trans fats from processed foods to as little as possible is recommended. Polyunsaturated fats are more heart healthy than saturated fats but an imbalance of polyunsaturated to monounsaturated fats may also be a negative health problem due to a possible increase in inflammation, so a diet with more monounsaturated fats or adequate amounts is important instead of having too many liquid vegetable oils (rich in polyunsaturated fats) or too many solid at room temperature coconut or palm oil or animal fat products (rich in saturated fats).
  • Some coconut oil in the diet may provide health benefits due to the specific phytonutrients it contains in addition to the type of monounsaturated fats it provides. Walnuts, hemp kernels, ground flaxseed meal, and blue green algae such as spirulina are vegetarian sources of a precursor or source of the beneficial omega 3 fatty acids that are also found in salmon, tuna, sardines, other fatty fish and krill oil.

Extra leafy green vegetables and herbs are very low carbohydrate and low calorie so have extra of those if hungry for more. Celery and other nonstarchy vegetables also have low amounts of carbohydrates. Sweet potato, potato, squash, and corn, peas, and other beans do contain significant amounts of carbohydrates and would need to be used with portion control if trying to keep to a 30% of carbohydrate diet plan.

Disclaimer: Opinions are my own and the information is provided for educational purposes within the guidelines of fair use. While I am a Registered Dietitian this information is not intended to provide individual health guidance. Please see a health professional for individual health care purposes. Thanks.